Tag Archives: Tommy Flanagan

The Cats: Tommy Flanagan, John Coltrane, Kenny Burrell, Idrees Sulieman

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“The cats? Which cats?”
“John Coltrane, Kenny Burrell, Tommy Flanagan, Idrees Sulieman, Louis Hayes and Doug Watkins.”
“Oh, those cats. Any good?”

This is another of the recordings that was on my list to write about when I was initially planning downwithit

This set recorded in April 1957 brings together John Coltrane, Kenny Burrell and Tommy Flanagan. Essentially, this was Flanagan’s session and four of the five compositions were written by the pianist. The resulting release is an engaging listen, without breaking through into new territories.

Minor Mishap opens matters. Whilst it sounds conventional and straightforward it survives as an opportunity to hear John Coltrane and Kenny Burrell playing together. It is a foot-tapper that you can hear on the following YouTube clip:

Next up, How Long Has This been Going On is a delightful piano centred version of the George and Ira Gershwin ballad (with sax, trumpet and guitar sitting out). Flanagan shows a real delicacy of touch and the accompaniment from drums and bass has a suitably light feel to it.

Eclypso combines a 5/4 introduction, followed by a longer 4/4 main section. Idrees Sulieman sounds somewhat brash and abrasive and his trumpet style throughout the album is not one that I particularly like. However, matters are redeemed by some sunny sounding guitar from Kenny Burrell, which brought a smile to my 92 year old aunt’s face, although she said that she does not think she will ever match KB’s playing, due to a wrist injury. She joked that maybe she would have to settle for the trumpet. There’s not too much to say about Solacium, other than it allows space for the playing of Coltrane and Burrell, while Tommy’s Time gives Flanagan nearly 12 minutes to show off his talents and include a good bass solo from Doug Watkins.

Four of the band are from. Detroit and provide evidence of a strong cohort of musicians who travelled from Motown to New York City to ply their trade. There’s more from Watkins and Hayes to be heard on fellow Detroit man Yusef Lateef’s Jazz Mood, an account of which follows below.

Tommy Flanagan spent 20 years as Ella Fitzgerald’s Musical Director, a testament to the silky elegance of his piano playing. He also contributed to two of the all time greatest sessions led by saxophonists, Sonny Rollins Saxophone Colossus and John Coltrane’s Giant Steps. The genius of of those ground breakers is not matched by The Cats, but it is an enjoyable session nonetheless. The New York Times obituary of Tommy Flanagan is to be found here.

The band etc: Tommy Flanagan (piano); John Coltrane (tenor saxophone); Idrees Sulieman (trumpet); Kenny Burrell (guitar); Louis Hayes (drums); Dough Watkins (bass). Recorded: 18 April 1957. Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey. Produced: Bob Weinstock. Recording Engineer: Rudy Van Gelder. Cover photos & design: Don Schlitten. Cover notes: Ira Gitler. Issued as Prestige 8217. Released 1959.

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