Tag Archives: Live

East Side All Star R & B Band: Live at East Side Jazz Club: 5 July 2016

East Side All Stars

With the holiday season fast approaching and jazz summer schools in the South of France beckoning the East Side Jazz Club hosted its (almost) end of season spectacular. Once again, this featured an all star band made up of three members of Jools Holland’s R & B Orchestra: Derek Nash (saxophones), Winston Rollins (trombone) and Chris Storr (trumpet) supplemented by Dave Ital on guitar, Geoff Gascoyne (bass), Pete Whittaker (organ) and the ever-present Clive Fenner (drums).

The irrepressible Derek Nash, musical director and MC for the evening, explained that the set would be showcasing the talents of Pete Whitaker on Hammond Organ and we would be visiting the work of The Incredible Jimmy Smith (hopefully without the rather spicy language that Smith occasionally used). Without further ado we were Back At the Chicken Shack, followed by I’m Comin’ Home by Bob Dorough.

Every member of the band is a great soloist and each was given plenty of space to show what they could do. As I said when I reviewed the same line up in the summer of 2014, Pete Whittaker was excellent on the Hammond emulator, although I would love to hear him play the real thing coupled with the power and presence of Leslie speakers, which can take your breath away. Jimmy McGriff’s Mod classic All About My Girl was great nonetheless.

An original Derek Nash composition, The Chant, took us into latin territory, with the audience, Storr and Rollins ably supplying the vocals. It was then time for Dave Ital to cut loose on guitar on the JBs signature piece, Pass The Peas. His inventive and very funky solo showed why he has shared a stage with Nile Rogers.

The first set closed with Joe Liggins The Honeydripper, the title track of Brother Jack McDuff’s 1961 Prestige album, which feature Grant Green on guitar. After such a hot performance audience and band were all ready for a long cooling drink.

Following the break Derek Nash introduced Jimmy Smith’s The Sermon, which I took a look at here in February 2016. Although we didn’t have either Lee Morgan or Tina Brooks in the house, Chris Storr (fresh from trumpet duties at Gregory Porter’s Glastonbury performance) and Nash were more than capable substitutes, although Pete Whittaker did not need to play long alarm notes to stop Derek Nash in the way Jimmy Smith had to do to Brooks on the original recording. After this we went down yonder to New Orleans and the funk of The Meters Cissy Strut. In a show of peak performances, the cutting contest, to see who could play the most intense solo, that pitted Rollins trombone against Nash’s tenor saxophone brought smiles to every face, including that of an otherwise very serious Chris Storr, who, having added his own highlights, savoured what he was hearing from stage right. The band were joined by feisty vocalist Jo Harman who will be appearing at BluesFest later this year and who supplied an extra dimension to the proceedings.

The night concluded with two final Jimmy Smith tunes. Nash, Storr and Rollins accepted the challenge of replicating Lalo Schifrin’s twelve piece brass section on The Cat with Nash seeming to channel the powerful sound of King Curtis who must have been looking down on Leytonstone last night (or maybe that’s just a flight of fancy from me), while Eight Counts For Rita reminded me that my Jimmy Smith collection is not quite complete as I don’t have his late career Dot Com Blues set yet.

Thanks to these great musicians for being willing to turn out for this suburban gig and all credit to Clive Fenner and colleagues for the calls made. It’s live performances of this quality that keep the music alive. It was another great evening at The East Side Jazz Club, where there is one final pre summer break chance to hear more great music when Simon Spillett appears with Ted Beaumont and Alec Dankworth on Tuesday 12 July.

By using the search box at the top of this page you will be able to look at content from over 140 separate posts for views and reviews of work by numerous modern jazz artists.

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Thelonious Monk Quartet with John Coltrane at Carnegie Hall

Monk & Coltrane at Carnegie Hall

Reader, I have a confession. This started out as a review of Thelonious Monk Live At The It Club (in Los Angeles 1964) but ended up as a look at the Carnegie Hall Concert (November 1957), via a visit to The Five Spot in New York City (August 1958). There is an explanation. Firstly, although it is an excellent recording featuring a great performance by Monk, a review of The It Club set is a daunting prospect. The Colombia double CD runs to over 150 minutes and contains 19 separate compositions. I did think about writing about it over two or three posts but, somehow that didn’t seem satisfactory. Secondly, I came to realise the significance of a short period during an amazing year for two of the all time greats (if not the greatest). Thirdly, I wanted to write about the Carnegie Hall Concert, with its tale of the re-discovery of a lost treasure of incalculable value. So here we go.

At the end of November 1957, Monk was invited to play in two performances of a benefit concert at Carnegie Hall to raise funds for the Morningside Community Center in Harlem. The prospect of making a contribution to this local social action centre appealed to him because as a young person he had spent most of his free time at a youth centre across the road from his family home in Midtown New York. The rest of the bill was stellar and included Billie Holliday, Dizzy Gillespie, Chet Baker, Zoot Simms and Sonny Rollins. Ray Charles headlined with a jazz set. Two dollars, or $3.95 for the best seats and you were in.

Monk Coltrane Carnegie Poster

In the four months before the concert, John Coltrane had been playing as part of Monk’s quartet at the Five Spot. This was the year in which Coltrane’s talents flowered. He had kicked heroin after being fired by Miles Davis in April 1957 and spent a great deal of time at Monk’s apartment, learning from the older master-musician. The superb and informative booklet which accompanies the CD release records Coltrane as saying:-
“I’d go by his apartment and get him out of bed (laughs). He’d wake up and roll over to the piano and start playing… He would stop and show me some parts that were pretty difficult, and if I had a lot of trouble, well, he’d get his portfolio out and show me the music…sometimes, we’d get through just one tune a day. Maybe.”

In ’57 Monk also had much to celebrate. Brilliant Corners had been released and earlier work on Blue Note and Riverside was re-released on the new 12″ long playing LPs. He had regained his Cabaret Card in May 1957 and was once again able to play in New York clubs that served alcohol. In July, he obtained a residency at The Five Spot, a small bar on the edge of The Bowery and on Tuesday July 16, he was joined by John Coltrane. The original piano was inadequate and in very poor repair but with an eye to the crowds lining up outside every night the club owner rapidly agreed to allow Monk to source a Baldwin baby grand.

The night at Carnegie Hall gave Monk the opportunity to perform in public on one of renowned venue’s concert grands. Monk’s Mood features a pianist taking great delight in the tone of an excellent piano and the fine acoustics of the hall (although he also had access to two baby grand Steinway pianos: his own rented instrument and one owned by his friend Baroness Pannonica de Koenigswarter). John Coltrane also approaches this beautiful ballad, that he made great efforts to learn and interpret, with great sensitivity, while Shadow Wilson’s drumming is sparse and complements the two soloists.

Evidence is angular and almost jagged with Monk giving Coltrane the space to develop a solo that contains fast phrases reminiscent of his work on the recently recorded Blue Train.

Crepuscule With Nellie had been written in the early summer of 1957 at a time when Monk’s beloved wife was facing a major thyroid operation. Monk laboured long and hard to produce music which captured his feelings and sought perfection in a piece that he usually played without improvisation or embellishment (on this version there is a brief reference to the ’52nd Street Theme’ just after Coltrane starts to play). ‘Crepuscule’ sounds like some type of seafood but it actually means ‘twilight’ and it was suggested that Monk should consider using the French word by his friend the Baroness.

This is followed by a jaunty version of Nutty, which features some fine percussion and great fluency from Coltrane.

Epistrophy is complex with some fine cymbal work. The quartet is really tight and this is superlative musicianship.

I understand that the final four tracks were recorded during the second set of the evening.

Bye-Ya is another vehicle for John Coltrane to shine on, although there is a short solo from Monk before the band moves straight into Sweet And Lovely, the standard favoured and recorded regularly by Monk.

Blue Monk is taken at a brisk pace. This tune is a classic which has become a staple of the young jazz musician’s repertoire, which means that it is regularly put through the mangle. I recently heard a sax player in a local pub who should never play this again until he can aspire to get within a million miles of how Coltrane plays here (not playing flat would be a start). You can listen courtesy of Praguedive on Youtube by touching or clicking on the arrow below:-

Finally a second truncated reprise of Epistrophy from the second set closes the recording.

Although Thelonious Monk and John Coltrane worked together during an intense period of about six months, very little was recorded by the great quartet. There were three studio tracks and a further live recording made by Coltrane’s first wife on a portable tape machine. There was an awareness that the Carnegie Hall concerts had been recorded by Voice of America and Coltrane biographer Lewis Porter had made enquiries at the Library of Congress, which was believed to be where they had been consigned to, but the tapes were lost. Then, in February 2005, Larry Appelbaum, a recording lab supervisor, found several tapes labelled ‘Carnegie Hall Jazz 1957’ and one had a box with a note labelled T Monk. A treasure had been discovered and within six months this resulting album was released. It is available on vinyl- with the Mosaic recording being the one to seek out. However, I’m delighted with the CD which comes complete with a brilliant booklet. This is a recording that I recommend without reservation and which I hope you will enjoy. Happy listening.

The band etc: Thelonious Monk (piano); John Coltrane (tenor sax); Ahmed Abdul-Malik (bass); Shadow Wilson (drums). Recorded: 29 November 1957. Produced for release: T.S. Monk and Michael Cuscuna. Cover illustration: Felix Sockwell. Sleeve notes: Amiri Baraka; Ira Gitler; Ashley Kahn; Stanley Crouch; Robin D.G. Kelley; Lewis Porter and Larry Appelbaum. Released as Blue Note 35173 on September 27, 2005.

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Marc Ribot live at Cafe Oto: 28 April 2016

image
(A2 screenprint sold via Cafe Oto- see link below. Permission granted for use here).

Marc Ribot is a brilliant guitarist and composer, whose last two releases have been reviewed here at downwithit, most recently, in March 2016, when I looked at his Young Philadelphians project (which you can read about here).

The diverse musical interests of this artist have resulted in him having an extensive and wide-ranging back catalogue of recordings. These include film scores; free-jazz; classical guitar; New York avant-garde; Cuban; funk and session work with an impressive list of artists. I was looking forward to this show, which was the first of two at this London venue but I was curious and indeed slightly apprehensive about what aspects of his repertoire would be featured.

This was my first visit to Cafe Oto which is located a couple of hundred metres from Dalston Junction Overground Station in a street that shows signs of recent changes of use from commercial to residential and entertainment and which now hosts a theatre and a couple of interesting bars, including Cafe Oto. The venue concentrates on cutting-edge music that is rarely heard elsewhere. My fellow audience members were an older, urban crowd drawn from the thoughtful and knowledgable segment of concertgoers. Conversations around me in the long line outside the club centered on gallery openings and other arts related matters and I felt confident that Ribot was going to be received with rapt attention for this sold-out performance.

A support slot was provided by Paul Abbott (drums) and Pat Thomas (piano). Back in the 80’s I saw Cecil Taylor play an extremely challenging set at Ronnie Scott’s. It was not to my taste and was 90 minutes of my life that could have been put to better use. For this set I was fortunate to be able to have a very clear view of the keyboard and, for this non-pianist, seeing exactly what Pat Thomas was doing made this free form performance intelligible. Thomas played keyboards on the Black Top album that I looked at back in August 2014 and it was good to have an opportunity to see him play live. The single long piece that they delivered had much of the complexity of a fiery late John Coltrane composition like Interstellar Space, although I felt it took on a degree of predictability towards its conclusion as I found myself having a very clear idea of where the duo were taking us. Perhaps I’m more open to less conventionally structured music these days so I have to say that I enjoyed this live set, although in my opinion it was music best heard in a live setting rather than something that would easily fit with my home listening.

It was soon time for Marc Ribot who played a single well worn-in steel strung acoustic guitar throughout the entire performance. His set included two pieces by classical composer Frantz Casseus and a John Zorn number which involved ‘preparation’ of the guitar using an additional bridge and what looked like a nail file and playing utilising a steel bottle neck, a bow and several balloons. As you may assume, this did sound most unconventional but was well received within the context of Ribot’s show. Overall, his playing entranced and shook away the cares of the world. There was no direct reference to the music of Young Philadelphians or to Albert Ayler but I was more than happy with the artist’s own choice of material.

Marc Ribot showed that he is a virtuoso guitarist, in complete command of his instrument and willing to forge out beyond the conventional range of the guitar. He can play beautifully but can also present the sour with the sweet in a way which stretches and enriches the listener’s metaphorical palate. I enjoyed myself tremendously and will be the first in the queue for tickets next time he plays at a venue near me. If you enjoy great guitar you may want to do the same.

The image is by Oliver Barrett from photos by Dawid Laskowski. It was formerly available from Cafe Oto While stocks lasted.

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Live In Tokyo- The Young Philadelphians (Marc Ribot)

Young Philadelphians Cover

Time for another review from a contemporary artist. We last met up with Marc Ribot on his Live At The Village Vanguard recording released in 2014. At that stage, amongst a myriad of projects, he was also working as part of a trio dedicated to revisiting and reprising the work of Albert Ayler. It was a refreshingly full-blooded affair that you can read about here.

This time round Ribot presents us with a different genre mash-up on an album which serves up seven tunes from the Gamble and Huff Philadelphia International soul school of the mid 1970’s. There is a twist though as he has enlisted bass guitarist Jamaaladee Tacuma and drummer G. Calvin Weston from Ornette Coleman’s Prime Time to produce and lay down a raw performance that is firmly located at the punk edge of the funk spectrum. It’s the wilder and rougher relative of the manicured orchestration of classic Philly, but it works.

Love Epidemic was recorded by Trammps in the early 1970’s. The title is somewhat ironic given the emergence of AIDS in the 1980″s but I expect the band were singing of something with a life-affirming rather than health-threatening intent. This is funky with blistering guitars.

Love TKO retains the silky soul feel of Teddy Pendergrass’s original and is played with great sensitivity by the two guitarists, with the ghost of Jimi Hendrix being channeled in towards the end.

Fly, Robin Fly was a hit for German Euro-disco outfit Silver Convention and flicks the switch to shift us back from smooch to dance mode. Although it made No. 1 in the States it only reached 28 in the UK singles charts. Some interesting effects pedal work and a drum solo from Weston adds to the interest here.

TSOP (The Sound of Philadelphia) was the signature tune of MFSB (Mother, Father, Sister, Brother in its less profane version), the Philadelphis International studio house band and theme tune for Soul Train. Great stuff, which takes me back. The arrangement here adopts a pleasant sounding cod-Japanese sound before breaking into the full Philly sound, with the string section in the background. Some songs make me move my feet or hips, this is one for the shoulders. Mary Halvorson, on second guitar, gets a solo here.

Then we are taken on The Ohio Players Love Rollercoaster. You can read about the macabre and extremely unlikely explanations of the scream which is heard on the original 1970’s recording here.

Do It Anyway You Wanna was cut by People’s Choice, sold over a million copies in the USA in its first three months following release and is quintessential funk.

The set closes with Van McCoy’s The Hustle, another memorable anthem from 1975, once again beginning with a nod to oriental music before picking up on the distinctive riff of the original. You too can do The Hustle courtesy of YouTube here:-

To play press or touch the arrow

The result is the evidence of what must have been an a very fine and downright funky performance at Tokyo’s Club Quattro in July 2014. It’s an interesting diversion down a road not dis-similar to that travelled by Grant Green on albums such as Alive, Live At Club Mozambique and Live at The Lighthouse. Sadly, I don’t know a great deal about Ornette Coleman’s Prime Time other than that I remember enjoying a CD that I had briefly in the late 80’s (I think) but I am sure there are those amongst you who can recommend what to seek out.

Marc Ribot’s website lists no less than ten discrete musical projects and five live film score sets. In addition, having read a number of interviews with him, he has on a number of occasions stated that he would not regard himself as a jazz guitarist. This makes makes efforts to pigeonhole him as futile as they are banal. He is playing a solo concert in London this May, which suggests that he will not be performing either music from this Young Philadephians set or from his Albert Ayler centred trio work. However, he will have one or more guitars with him and I hope to be there to hear what he offers up. I’m sure whatever he plays, the audience will not be be disappointed.

The band etc:- Marc Ribot (guitar); Jamaaladee Tacuma (electric bass guitar); G. Calvin Weston (drums); Mary Halvorson (guitar); Takako Siba (viola); Yoshie Kajiwara (violin); China Azuma (cello). Recorded live, 28 July 2014. Club Quattro, Tokyo, Japan. Live Engineer: Seigen Ono. Mixing Engineer: Francois Lardeau. Cover design: Gold Unlimited. Cover photos: Hiroki Nishioka. Released February 2016 as Yellowbird yeb- 7760.

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Pharoah Sanders live in San Francisco: 12 January 2015

Regular readers may know that Pharoah Sanders is a saxophonist that I enjoy very much.

When checking to see if any UK dates are scheduled (sadly, none listed at present), I came across a recent live review by Gary Vercelli, which you can read here. The author was wondering if 74 year old Pharoah can still perform at a high level. His conclusion is that:-

Pharoah Sanders showed that age is just a number. He still negotiates the chord changes with ease and finesse and inner child is still very much alive!

That’s good news– hopefully we’ll see for ourselves later in 2015.

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Steve Williamson live at Pizza Express Jazz Club, Soho. 1st September 2014

The summer of 2014 has hosted the welcome re-emergence of top British saxophonist, Steve Williamson. Back in late-June he featured in the re-creation of A Love Supreme (which you can read about here) and then guested on Black Top One (here). Although both of these performances gave a glimpse of his talents I was eagerly awaiting an opportunity to hear him play his own material as a leader. When I read about the September gig at The Dean Street Jazz Club I contacted them immediately, to be at the head of the queue. I enjoyed his playing over 20 years ago and it would be fascinating to find out how he had developed in the intervening years.

This was his first gig as leader of his own band, playing his own set for well over ten years. Backed by Michael Mondesir on bass, Robert Mitchell, piano, with Seb Rochford providing the drums (and last encountered here on percussion duty with Polar Bear), he was in superb company and he told us of his delight to be sharing the stage with them.

The first set opened with the unusual time signature of the lengthy Soon Come, which allayed any concerns that he may have lost his edge on tenor saxophone. Cracked Earth was next and I pondered the difference between performers who play their own material, rather than drawing on standards. I concluded that it depends on the quality of the material and Steve Williamson’s has tensile strength throughout.

Waltz For Grace, so old a favourite that my copy is on a C90 cassette, followed. SW switched to soprano sax and his anthem featured London-based Sardinian vocalist Filomena Campus, who has a most incredible jazz voice. Some people just sing while a very few others make use of an incredible instrument that they are gifted with. Campus is part of this small second group and I hope it won’t be long before I see her deliver her own set, as I’m sure that would be a treat.

Mandy’s Mood which sounds like a nod to Freedom Jazz Dance to me, took us to the interval.

Wakening opened the second half and was followed by Gary Bartz’s Celestial Blues, Journey To The Truth and Water Like Water.

Williamson’s confidence and assurance increased with every tune and this band, who were solid and unwavering in their support, will be a joy to watch if they come your way. I’ll certainly be hoping to see more of them as the days draw in towards winter.

As I’m confident that there is a great deal more to come, I will rate this gig as a 7/10 performance and bid the man himself a huge ‘Welcome back! You’ve been missed’.

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Leytonstone Festival R & B All Stars Live at East Side Jazz Club

When I started downwithit.info I was confident that I would be able to choose what I wanted to write about from my fairly sizeable collection of recorded music.

I was far less certain about writing about live acts, especially British based performers. I wasn’t too sure about where to start and I’d harboured something of a prejudice about the homegrown scene. There was only one way to deal with that, which was to get out and listen to some live music into the smaller venues that I prefer to cavernous barns.

I’d wondered about how the performers who had come out of the Jazz Warriors stable had fared and trying to answer that question led me to The East Side Jazz Club in Leytonstone. It wasn’t too far from home and the admission fee was moderate so in mid-May I made my first visit.

Denys Baptiste was calling the shots that night and I liked what I saw, so much so that I have now made five return visits.

There’s only one good thing to be said about prejudice. Generally speaking it is an imaginary chain that binds us in our heads and once recognised it is relatively easy to deal with. The music that I’ve heard at ESJC has been brilliant and it just makes me want to seek out more.

Over the summer I’m going to have to venture elsewhere because the ESJC lot head off to run jazz summer schools in France. I’ve already got somewhere in mind for next week and I’m looking forward to venturing elsewhere. But what of last night?

The final session of this season offered up The Leytonstone Festival R & B All Stars. Featuring members of Jools Holland’s Big Band, this was not a gig that I wanted to miss. I wasn’t disappointed

Four of the band, Derek Nash (saxophones), Dave Ital (guitar)’ Winston Rollins (trombone) and Chris Storr (trumpet) are also members of Jools Holland’s renowned R & B Orchestra, while Geoff GascoynePete (bass) and Pete Whittaker (organ) are masters of their instruments too. Of course, Clive Fenner was on drum duty and as in charge of his kit as ever.

Derek Nash was directing the proceedings. As a former saxophonist (albeit probably once ranked towards the very bottom of the 50,000+ tenor sax players in Great Britain) I take a keen interest in how my more successful rivals are doing. I’m always suspicious of saxophonists who double-up on other members of the saxophone family. Derek Nash had a tenor, alto and soprano with him and I was sure that his playing would be badly exposed on at least one. I was very wrong and he performed with total command of each of the three instruments. Having been listening to Archie Shepp and Dollar Brand’s Duet set quite often over the last few weeks and taking the view that it is marred by Shepp’s relatively weak reedy sound on that session, it was an absolute pleasure to hear Nash perform with strength, gusto and a full-bodied range.

He also led the band with aplomb and his introductions to the tunes were amusing and very informative. I intend to make it my business that it won’t be long until I see him play again.

The set was a cornocopia of jazz, mambo, Latin and funk numbers, many of which were original compositions. The horn section fills were as crisp and well-drilled as I would expect of pros who perform in an established big band and who probably communicate through some higher form of musical telepathy anyway (sorry- I must be thinking of Sun Ra’s Arkestra there).

One of the highlights was I’m Comin’ Home by Bob Dorough. It is a track that I had always admired but until Derek and Geoff spoke about him, I knew nothing of the composer. A John Schofield tune also impressed with its fire and funk and will lead me to look out for this guitarist who I had wrongly placed in an ECM ethereal pigeonhole

Geoff Gascoyne may turn out to be a drain on my pocket. He played the entire set on a bass ukulele, which is an instrument I’d never seen before but which is as cool as the cat’s pyjamas. I want one! Although I didn’t realise it, I had heard him play before, as he was with the excellent Everything But The Girl on their early 90’s Worldwide album and also with Georgie Fame. His bass playing was really engaging and I look forward to hearing him again, preferably on an acoustic double bass.

Guitarist Dave Ital was showcased on Pass The Peas by Maceo Parker and the JBs. He is currently working with Nile Rodgers, the musician who inspired me to put downwithit.info together and his deft alacrity up and down the fretboard showed why. ESJC is a little too restrained to resort to a spontaneous dance explosion but if it had, it would have been no less than this funky expedition cried out for.

Shut your eyes on the right number when Chris Storr solos and you could imagine you were listening to Miles Davis. He is really good. The clarity of his sound on both trumpet and fluegelhorn was impressive and, from a selfish personal perspective, the only way he could have topped his performance would have been if he had suddenly pulled the distinctive trumpet intro to Arthur Conley and Otis Redding’s Sweet Soul Music out of his bag (I’m sure it’s in there). Winston Rollins was equally assured on trombone while Pete Whittaker would have benefitted from a little more attack from a full Hammond Organ with Leslie speakers, rather than from the smaller scale instrument that he was playing tonight. When I listen to Hammond I like the whoosh from the Leslie’s and the sense that my fillings are in peril from the visceral power of a beast of a machine. Looking at Pete’s website it is clear that he regards the full sound as his preferred option- but a chopped down electronic keyboard is obviously more practical for gigs.

Clive Fenner anchored it all most ably although his use of the cowbell on the Latin numbers suggests that he may be considering re-locating his summer jazz school to one of the Italian Swiss Cantons (if there are any).

So all in all, I had another fine evening at ESJC, which now takes a break until 23 September. I’ll be aiming to get myself back there in the autumn.

This performance merits an 8/10 on my patented rate a gig scale. It gets as close to a 9 as can be without quite crossing into that rarified zone.

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Denys Baptiste live at East Side Jazz Club. May 13 2014

Many years ago I used to get myself along, on occasion, to The South Side Soul Club, which was hosted in a room above a busy bar. It wasn’t quite a function at the junction because it was next to Clapham Common tube station, rather than near the railway hub- but it was a damn fine Northern Soul venue. Indeed, I remember seeing a wonderous declaration of urban romance when a young woman wrote ‘I Love You Seth’ (or whatever he was called) in the talcum powder that the ruler of her heart had spread to ease his terpsichorean endeavours.

Glancing at London Jazz Collector’s fantastic blog the other day, I read that one of his correspondents had recommended the East Side Jazz Club. Two clicks on the keyboard later I had discovered that the venue was within easy striking distance of my home and that there was a great bill on the following Tuesday. Renowned tenor saxophonist Denys Baptiste was set to appear, with Gary Crosby on bass. They were to be supported by club stalwart and resident drummer, Clive Fenner and Joe Armon-Jones on piano.

I’m always excited by a visit to a new club (doesn’t happen a great many times these days though), so off I went to Leytonstone searching for the young jazz rebels.

The short drive was rapidly completed and the venue was another great pub function room, which looked as though it had recently been redecorated. The extremely moderate admittance fee was duly surrendered and we were in.

The band were already on the stand and it was an absolute pleasure to hear great musicians who probably had never played together as a group before coming to terms with classic hard bop and ballads (OK, I’m well aware that Baptiste and Crosby have played together for years).

The first half encompassed a great version of God Bless The Child, Denys Baptiste’s sparkling take on Dear John, Freddie Hubbard’s adaptation of John Coltrane’s Giant Steps and a calypso flavoured tune that made me think of a Sonny Rollins.

I wasn’t the only one thinking along those lines because the opener for the second half was the Rollins signature piece, St Thomas, ever a favourite of mine. Denys Baptiste introduced it by saying that it was chosen as a direct result of a conversation he had during the interval.

I remain slightly puzzled by the next tune. It sounded like a speeded up version of Charlie Parker’s amazing Parker’s Mood- but then again, it could have been a Thelonious Monk composition. Whichever, it enabled venue debutant, Joe Armon-Jones to showcase his delightful piano playing talents. By this time the band were really working together, with Denys Baptiste and Gary Crosby showing themselves to be masters of their craft.

The evening closed with an adventurous take on Joe Henderson’s Inner Urge. It was a privilege to see such fine musicians conjuring the music from their collective imaginations. What the audience was watching was the essence of jazz. No four musicians have ever played that combination of tunes exactly the same way before. Nor will anyone ever again. In tangible terms, a fiver was paid but in real terms, what we experienced was priceless.

Special mention must be made of Clive Fenner, the resident drummer. I can’t imagine the levels of experience, skill and confidence his role, as an accompanist to the weekly changing cast of visitors, must require.

I didn’t win the raffle (a quid could deliver the choice between a serviceable bottle of Corbieres or Art Blakey Live at Cafe Bohemia on CD). Nor did I find the elusive young jazz rebels who were either preening themselves for a late Tuesday session in trend-central Hoxton with LJC’s fabled East London Jazz DJ Collective, or watching Leyton Orient win through to a Wembley playoff final down the road. What I did have was a fine time listening to amazing live music.

Whilst I don’t suppose Polar Bear will be appearing there anytime in the near future, I’ll be back there soon.

The East Side Jazz Club has a website which you can visit here.

Latest updates about the club are on Twitter @EastSJC

Denys Baptiste’s website is here

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