Category Archives: Richard Davis

Classic Albums on downwithit.info in 2014

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Happy New Year to all visitors, new and old. Here’s my 100th post on downwithit.

I still have an unfinished task from 2014 which is to look back at all the classic sets that I reviewed here in 2014. By classic I mean anything other than a new release so there are one or two sets from the present millennium included here. A quick count indicates that I wrote about 26 of these albums in 2014, so I think I can conclude that I wasn’t idle, especially given that I also wrote about a number of contemporary sets and offered up some live reviews.

What follows may be a bit of a trudge through a list, but I have linked to all the reviews and if any catch your interest, please click and take a look.

On NYD 2014 I started with a bang by taking a look at John Coltrane’s Blue Train, one of my all-time favorites that I urged everyone to obtain and listen to if they hadn’t done so already.

This was followed up by Lee Morgan’s The Sidewinder and a track that inspired numerous imitations.

My January postings dipped into dinner jazz in the form of Grover Washington Jr’s All The King’s Horses and British hard bop from the 1980’s UK jazz revival via Tommy Chase and Groove Merchant.

Thoughts of Tommy Chase led downwithit.info into fresh territory and I decided to devote some time to exploring the current scene, which was something that I really enjoyed during the course of 2014. If you want a recap of the newly released albums that I reviewed last year, they can be found here and my trawl of live performances is referred to here. I’m not sure if my ramblings have encouraged the purchase of a single album or attendance at any gigs but if they have, please leave a comment and let me know.

I wrote five reviews in February 2014 opening with Horace Parlan’s piano trio set Movin’ And Groovin’. I followed this up with Johnny Griffin’s Big Soul Band. I wavered about posting on that one because I thought that it was something of a departure from the classic small band context and that it would not fit- but it seemed to be OK and remains a popular review according to my stats.

Fred Jackson’s great Hootin”N Tootin’ was next up. At the time, I checked Wikipedia which did not give a date of death. Hopefully Fred still is with us and is enjoying a peaceful retirement at the grand age of 85 years old. If anybody knows more, please tell us.

A further less well-known Blue Note set, John Jenkins With Kenny Burrell was placed in the spotlight, before I took a look at Thembi by my favourite living saxophonist, Pharoah Sanders.

March 2014 saw me take an overdue look at Yusef Lateef (more to come in 2015) and Jazz Mood, his first set as a leader from 1957. The Cats, a fine session featuring John Coltrane followed and I made my first visit to a Grant Green recording on these pages with Grant’s First Stand.

In April, I brought news a a real gem: Heavy Sounds by Elvin Jones and Richard Davis, another set to listen to even if you have to beg steal or borrow. A slow journey north up the motorway system led me to grapple with Bobby Hutcherson’s Happenings. The same trip north gave me time to take a look at The Hot Club Of San Francisco’s Veronica and I got hold of a copy of Jimmy Smith’s lacklustre a less then incredible Softly As A Summer Breeze.

In May Sonny Clark’s Sonny Clark Trio was followed by another Sonny in the form of Sonny Rollins On Impulse, which sounds like a compilation album but isn’t. Later in the month, my local second-hand record store yielded up a copy of John Coltrane’s Ole.

I took another look at Grant Green with his lesser known Iron City, featuring a strong version of Hi-Heeled Sneakers, before returning to Blue Note and Harold Vick’s Steppin’ Out and later in September with Joe Henderson and Inner Urge.

I took the view that Archie Shepp and Dollar Brand’s Duet was slightly spoiled by Shepp’s poor sax technique on a couple of tracks, but I enjoyed Hank Mobley’s great Roll Call, Grant Green’s Green Street and Freddie Hubbard’s Ready For Freddie.

2014 was the year in which a bit of research yielded some more answers about Freddie Roach’s later years and I shelled out for a first pressing of All That’s Good which turned out to be much better than a shocking review suggested it would be.

I’ve already got a the first few reviews for 2015 in mind, so please come back soon and see what I’ve been listening to and remember that comments are most welcome.

One New Year’s Resolution– the quality of the photography at downwithit must improve. No excuses!

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Heavy Sounds: Elvin Jones and Richard Davis

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It’s probably just an impression that I have, but recordings on the Impulse label are made up of a curious mixture of artists and styles. Over the years I have been very slow to start to listen and appreciate these beasts with their orange and black spines. My first three purchases were John Coltrane sets: The Gentle Side, a curious concoction of immediately essential ballads and vocal tracks that took time to grow on me; the masterful creation that is A Love Supreme and then the veritable maelstrom of Interstellar Space, which challenged me and anybody else within earshot and put me off Impulse for a couple of years. Along the way I’d also listened to Albert Ayler’s Live in Greenwich Village, where The Truth Is Marching In is another challenge (but one that has grown on me in the twenty-five years since I first heard it and I expect to return there in due course). I now have over well over 30 recordings on Impulse but that brush with Coltrane at his fiercest has made me wary.

Last week I was browsing in my local used record emporium when I came across Heavy Sounds. ‘What have we here?’ thought I. At first I wasn’t particularly keen, with the title seeming to scream “Danger! Audio Shock Ahead”. After all, this was an album centring on a drummer and a bass player. What could it possibly be like? How heavy would it be? Eventually, I sneered at caution, overcame the unworthy opponent blocking my path and parted with a couple of hard-earned leisure pounds.

I’m delighted that I did. The title is a poor one- Soul-Stirring Sounds would be far better, because it is a work that is diverse and impressive. Raunchy Rita, the opener is a delightful soul flavoured extravaganza. Without further ado, have a listen on YouTube courtesy of Rafael Garcia.

To play, click or touch the arrow.

Next up is a version of Shiny Stockings, a standard which was made popular by Count Basie in a version which featured a solo by Elvin Jones’s older brother, Thad. Elvin makes considerable use of the brushes in his drum accompaniment to this track.

M.E.is surprising. Although only four musicians appear on this track, it has a drilled, big band crispness- almost an orchestral sound. I would guess that this is down to the musical arrangement.

Summertime follows. The recording session was originally booked to feature the guitar of Larry Coryell, but he was unavailable. With studio time on their hands, Jones and Davis began to improvise around the great classic standard, which both men had dreamt of doing with full orchestral backing. The decision was made to record it as a duo and fortune intervened with the result that a special piece of music was created. Starting with bowed bass and atmospheric fills from Jones on the drums, this piece is one that you really should seek out and listen to.

Elvin’s Guitar Blues is next up and features the drummer on acoustic guitar, accompanied by Foster on tenor sax. It’s a delightful blues and sits very well in the context of the set. Here’s That Rainy Day is Foster’s vehicle, featuring a fine extended tone-poem of a saxophone solo that builds from being reflective and almost languid before soaring.

There’s an interesting diversion in quiz territory and if you are ever asked: ‘What links Van Morrison, Eric Dolphy and Bruce Springsteen?’, the answer follows:- Richard Davis played bass on Van Morrison’s Astral Weeks, considered by many critics to be one of the greatest rock albums of all time, as well as Bruce Springstein’s Born To Run and Laura Nyro’s Smile. He was also the bass player on Eric Dolphy’s Out To Lunch.

The front cover features a superbly lit, cigarette shrouded image taken by Charles (Chuck) Stewart, who has been responsible for over 3000 album covers to date. Given a basic Kodak camera as a schoolboy, he used it the day he received it to photograph the great Marian Anderson (the first Black woman to perform at NY Metropolitan Opera, as late as 1955!). The photos later sold, which meant that he was a professional photographer from the first day he owned a camera. A previously sourced interview with Stewart outlined his approach as a photographer (sadly the link had expired as of 250917):-‘I just saw a moment that I thought would be rather exciting, that moment when I pushed the button, and apparently it worked.’ He was clearly gifted with the ability to choose the elusive ‘decisive moment’ on very many occasions.

A quick look on Amazon indicates that the CD can get a bit pricy- so perhaps Heavy Sounds is an album to grab If you come across a copy while browsing the second hand music shops. If you do find it, don’t be put off by the title and buy without hesitation.

The band etc: Elvin Jones (drums; guitar track); Richard Davis (bass); Frank Foster (tenor saxophone: tracks 1-3, 5 & 6); Billy Greene (piano: tracks 1, 3, 5 & 6). Produced: Bob Thiele. Recorded: RCA Studios, New York City (not at RVG as sometimes claimed)19 & 20 June 1967. Cover Design: Barbara & Robert Flynn. Cover Photography: Charles Stewart. Released: 1968. Original release: AS 9160.

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