Category Archives: Kenny Burrell

Bass On Top- Paul Chambers

Bass On Top 2

‘Play the one with the man on the cello’ is a frequent request in my home. No matter how many times I answer by saying ‘Not again! And it’s a double bass ffs!’ Bass On Top remains number one choice when something that isn’t too strident is called for. Time to take a look at this wonderful album and if you read to the end there’s a tale of crime involving a sculpture of a beautiful German woman.

The great double bassist, Paul Chambers recorded this album on July 14 1957. It was his fourth set as a leader and the third to be released on Blue Note. A member of Miles Davis’s first great quintet/sextet, Paul Chambers drew on early classical training in Detroit and became one of the first jazz bassists to play bowed (arco) sections live and on recordings. He featured on numerous key sessions with a pantheon of modern jazz greats (over 300 sessions between 1955 and 1962), including contributions to Monk’s Brilliant Corners, Oliver Nelson’s The Blues And The Abstract Truth, Coltrane’s Blue Train, Sonny Clark’s Cool Struttin’ and Art Pepper Meets The Rhythmn Section and of course Miles Davis. There were fourteen releases of sessions led by John Coltrane and seven led by Hank Mobley. Indeed, his work on Kind Of Blue has been praised as one of the great jazz bass performances by some people who like to quantify things like that.

The opening track here, Yesterdays, opens with three choruses that strike a subdued tone of wistfulness, or saudade as the Potuguese would say, before the tempo changes (and if I’m not mistaken, which is very likely, the key moves from minor to major). The bow is used throughout. Blue without being a blues track, Yesterday’s is a unique and much covered jazz composition both by instrumentalists and vocalists. The full lyrics are here– but these will suffice now:

Then gay youth was mine, truth was mine
Joyous free in flame and life
Then sooth was mine
Sad am I, glad am I
For today I’m dreamin’ of yesterdays.

The sense of saudade in a nutshell!

You’d Be So Nice To Come Home To follows. It is a jaunty Cole Porter number played finger-style this time (pizzicato). There is lots of space for PC to develop solo ideas as Kenny Burrell reverses conventional roles to keep time on rhythm guitar before getting his own Hot Clubesque solo as PC walks the tune towards a tasteful contribution from Hank Jones on piano.

Chasin’ the Bird by Charlie Parker offers up a neat intro on the tune’s head from Kenny Burrell (not that we’d expect anything less) before PC gets to work again. His bass solo is fluent and creative with the second solo from Jones’ piano providing another perfect element here. Burrell gets a solo too before sticksmanship from Art Taylor and a re-statement of the head, which brings this fine rendition to a close.

Dear Old Stockholm flows down deliciously in a well-ordered mainstream sort of way that is very satisfying. This is the selection from YouTube that I’ve chosen to accompany this post:

To play either touch or click on the arrow.

PC then plays Miles Davis’ The Theme. He was on the original recording in 1955 and this bebop workout sees his bow produced and used to great effect again.

Finally on the original release, Confessin’ is a lively tour de force take on the much covered standard with PC’s bass to the fore delivering a compelling interpretation until Hank Jones has a brief solo.

My copy of Bass On Top is the RVG CD version as the original Blue Note vinyl pressing is a rare find and priced well beyond what I can afford. The RVG edition has its bonuses though. Chamber Mates was not on the original release but it is an uptempo number that sounds like great fun, especially for jazz dancers. There are the usual excellent additional notes from Bob Blumenthal and three Francis Wolff photos from the hallowed Mosaic Collection. These were taken at the actual session and one of them, copied below, prompted me to undertake some additional research.

PC Bass Head 2

You will note that a youthful Paul Chambers (amazingly only 22 years old when the session was recorded) is playing, supervised by the sculpture of a female face on the bass head, which is as remarkable as it is unusual. I’d never seen its like before, although the power of the Internet soon introduced me to a wide range of ornate bass heads and the following:-

“Well, in growing up in New York with Bass in hand in the mid-late 60s, I just missed Paul Chambers. He died about when I joined the Union. I did however see his Bass in pictures and asked one Luthier about that carved Ladies Head on the top of the Neck/Scroll. The Bass was a Germanic Shop type Bass from the late 19th-early 20th century or so. The Head was added by him I heard but in either case, it was not part of that Bass.” (Ken Smith- see here)

There’s another story about the bass with the woman’s head possibly, apocryphal, but well worth the telling. It is said that the maestro and Doug Watkins, another great bass player and close friend (and some say, cousin) of PC were on tour in Italy in the 60’s when they saw the bass, unattended in a car belonging to a member of a classical orchestra. They helped themselves to it and subsequently shared the instrument back in the States. Then, one dark and stormy night, as they usually are in the best tales, the original owner of the bass walked into the club where PC was playing it. What happened next… …Well, he listened and listened some more before confronting PC at the interval, when he told him that he’d never heard the instrument sound so great and that he would like to give it to PC with his blessing. As somebody famous once wrote ‘The bitter comes out better on a stolen guitar.’

Now I don’t know it this is true, or not. If it isn’t, I hope that the spirits or descendants of PC and Doug Watkins will not be offended by my repetition of scurrilous tittle-tattle. In any event it’s a story too good to miss. Who knows, the bass with the woman’s head may still be out there and one dear reader may actually be its custodian as I type this? If you have it, please let us know, we’d love to hear. Was the mysterious woman ever given a name? Someone may still know. Unless I hear differently, for personal reasons, I’ll settle for Gwladys.

Part of the reason I haven’t been blogging is that it is a bit dull to just trot out my impressions of albums. I like to add a bit of extra information that’s a bit harder to find for the reader and sometimes sourcing anything new is a bit of a struggle. Hopefully, my musings about PC and Bass On Top have achieved that this time round.

If you are interested in an analysis of Paul Chambers bass style, there’s a very fine essay written by Brian Casey, which you can read here.

The band etc: Paul Chambers (double bass);Kenny Burrell guitar); Hank Jones (piano); Art Taylor (drums). Recorded: 14 July 1957. Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey. Produced: Alfred Lion. Recorded: Rudy Van Gelder. Sleeve Notes: Robert Levin. Cover design: Reid Miles. Cover photos: Francis Wolff. Issued as Blue Note 1569 in 1957.

RIP Paul Chambers, Jr (April 22, 1935 – January 4, 1969).

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The Sermon: Jimmy Smith

Jimmy Smith The Sermon cover

Time to get going again! My last posting here was over three months ago. So, no excuses, time to get to work and get something new out.

The Sermon is a good place to start. Three tracks are taken from two recording dates in August 1957 and February 1958. This set was Smith’s fourteenth Blue Note release during a period from 1956 onwards when his Hammond organ albums were the label’s major cash cow. Indeed on hearing him play in Greenwich Village, Miles Davis told label boss and producer Al Lion, ‘Alfred, he’s going to make you a lot of money.’ He recorded no less than 10 sessions in 1957 alone. The Sermon is the second of two titles to be taken from the August 57/February 58 sessions with House Party being released first, in 1958.

My theory about the Hammond organ phenomenon is that in a time when live popular music was usually played in small venues without powerful amplification, the sudden introduction of this behemoth of an instrument created a new kind of live excitement. In the case of the Hammond, what is played in a small venue can extend beyond the aural to become something that is almost palpable. You can hit all the right notes on other instruments but it is the swells and trills of the mighty B3 organ, played at volume, that seem to me to have a tangible quality all of their own. My own instrument was the tenor sax (played very badly) and I love its sound but the Hammond does something that is very different. I’m not a keyboardist but I am aware that modern technology enables all sorts of sounds to be emulated but unless somebody invites me to a blindfold audition and convinces me that the contrary applies I’ll continue to believe that it is impossible to capture and faithfully replicate the sound of a Hammond and Leslie speaker. Of course, this is an invitation for any of you out there to tell me that this is nonsense and prove your case with suitable sonic illustration.

The title track, one of two JS original compositions here, is a tribute to Horace Silver and opens with a long opportunity for Jimmy Smith to stretch out and develop his ideas before the baton is passed to the great Kenny Burrell. A typically tasteful laid back exploration follows, somehow so appropriate for the lazy Sunday morning that I’m writing this on. Then it’s over to Tina Brooks, whose mellow mid-register tenor saxophone adds a deliciously sour texture for an extended solo. Jimmy Smith sends out long note signals for Brooks to wind up, but they are ignored because Tina’s really blowing the blues here. His solo ends and is followed by a couple of words that I cannot quite make out, but which sound like appreciative ones. Over to Lee Morgan which contains punchy staccato notes and a longer run. Lou Donaldson’s solo is another masterful contribution to the whole before the ensemble briefly reappear and Jimmy Smith gleefully leads us to the fade. Art Blakey plays drums with understated power but no solo here.

On the sleeve notes to the RVG CD edition, Bob Blumenthal reminds us that the recent introduction of the 12 inch long playing record allowed musicians the space to record with more space to develop ideas and less need to limit a recording to the shorter length which was the previous limit of what could be captured and released in earlier 10″ 78 rpm disc format. Although some, so-called, blowing sessions could sound self-indulgent, The Sermon uses the extended period to great effect. You can hear the full track from YouTube via the following link:-

To view, click on or touch the arrow

J.O.S. was recorded during the previous year, in the August of 1957 with George Coleman (alto sax), Eddie McFadden (guitar) and Donald Bailey (drums) rather than the greater stellar magnitude of Burrell, Blakey and Donaldson. It is a pacy outing with a fluent alto solo from Coleman. Jimmy Smith signals the end of this with what Ira Gitler’s original sleeve notes liken to a musical buzzer. He later becomes increasingly insistent that Morgan should end his solo but Morgan is in full flow and wisely ignores a full four blasts to offer another fine chorus. McFadden’s guitar picking is deft and delightful before the session leader duly takes the last solo.

Flamingo is from the February 1958 session, although Brooks and Donaldson sit out. It starts with a beautiful statement of the theme on Morgan’s trumpet before it is swapped to Burrell and then taken back again. There’s a sense of smoochy luxuriance here- the sort of ballad that you have to be in the right sort of mood for and a bit too MOR for some ears. It was written in 1940 by Ted Grouya and Edmund Anderson, with Duke Ellington as an early performer before Earl Bostic too it to the top of the R&B charts in 1951. Miles Davis would have done it differently and played half as many notes but Morgan’s own greatness shines through.

I’ve struggled with this review, which suggests that I don’t regard this as the essential Jimmy Smith set that the newcomer should seek out immediately. However, it does have its charms and delights.

With a writing block dispensed with, I’m away out of the traps again with lots of ideas about what is to follow. Thanks for visiting downwithit.info

The band etc:- Jimmy Smith (Hammond organ); Tina Brooks (tenor sax); George Coleman (alto sax); Lou Donaldson (alto sax); Lee Morgan (trumpet); Kenny Burrell (guitar); Eddie McFadden (guitar); Art Blakey (drums); Donald Bailey (drums). Recorded 25 August 1957 and February 25 1958. Produced: Al Lion; Manhattan Towers, New York City. Sleeve Notes: Ira Gitler. Cover photos: Francis Wolff. Cover Design: Reid Miles. Issued as Blue Note BLP 4011.

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Classic Albums on downwithit.info in 2014

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Happy New Year to all visitors, new and old. Here’s my 100th post on downwithit.

I still have an unfinished task from 2014 which is to look back at all the classic sets that I reviewed here in 2014. By classic I mean anything other than a new release so there are one or two sets from the present millennium included here. A quick count indicates that I wrote about 26 of these albums in 2014, so I think I can conclude that I wasn’t idle, especially given that I also wrote about a number of contemporary sets and offered up some live reviews.

What follows may be a bit of a trudge through a list, but I have linked to all the reviews and if any catch your interest, please click and take a look.

On NYD 2014 I started with a bang by taking a look at John Coltrane’s Blue Train, one of my all-time favorites that I urged everyone to obtain and listen to if they hadn’t done so already.

This was followed up by Lee Morgan’s The Sidewinder and a track that inspired numerous imitations.

My January postings dipped into dinner jazz in the form of Grover Washington Jr’s All The King’s Horses and British hard bop from the 1980’s UK jazz revival via Tommy Chase and Groove Merchant.

Thoughts of Tommy Chase led downwithit.info into fresh territory and I decided to devote some time to exploring the current scene, which was something that I really enjoyed during the course of 2014. If you want a recap of the newly released albums that I reviewed last year, they can be found here and my trawl of live performances is referred to here. I’m not sure if my ramblings have encouraged the purchase of a single album or attendance at any gigs but if they have, please leave a comment and let me know.

I wrote five reviews in February 2014 opening with Horace Parlan’s piano trio set Movin’ And Groovin’. I followed this up with Johnny Griffin’s Big Soul Band. I wavered about posting on that one because I thought that it was something of a departure from the classic small band context and that it would not fit- but it seemed to be OK and remains a popular review according to my stats.

Fred Jackson’s great Hootin”N Tootin’ was next up. At the time, I checked Wikipedia which did not give a date of death. Hopefully Fred still is with us and is enjoying a peaceful retirement at the grand age of 85 years old. If anybody knows more, please tell us.

A further less well-known Blue Note set, John Jenkins With Kenny Burrell was placed in the spotlight, before I took a look at Thembi by my favourite living saxophonist, Pharoah Sanders.

March 2014 saw me take an overdue look at Yusef Lateef (more to come in 2015) and Jazz Mood, his first set as a leader from 1957. The Cats, a fine session featuring John Coltrane followed and I made my first visit to a Grant Green recording on these pages with Grant’s First Stand.

In April, I brought news a a real gem: Heavy Sounds by Elvin Jones and Richard Davis, another set to listen to even if you have to beg steal or borrow. A slow journey north up the motorway system led me to grapple with Bobby Hutcherson’s Happenings. The same trip north gave me time to take a look at The Hot Club Of San Francisco’s Veronica and I got hold of a copy of Jimmy Smith’s lacklustre a less then incredible Softly As A Summer Breeze.

In May Sonny Clark’s Sonny Clark Trio was followed by another Sonny in the form of Sonny Rollins On Impulse, which sounds like a compilation album but isn’t. Later in the month, my local second-hand record store yielded up a copy of John Coltrane’s Ole.

I took another look at Grant Green with his lesser known Iron City, featuring a strong version of Hi-Heeled Sneakers, before returning to Blue Note and Harold Vick’s Steppin’ Out and later in September with Joe Henderson and Inner Urge.

I took the view that Archie Shepp and Dollar Brand’s Duet was slightly spoiled by Shepp’s poor sax technique on a couple of tracks, but I enjoyed Hank Mobley’s great Roll Call, Grant Green’s Green Street and Freddie Hubbard’s Ready For Freddie.

2014 was the year in which a bit of research yielded some more answers about Freddie Roach’s later years and I shelled out for a first pressing of All That’s Good which turned out to be much better than a shocking review suggested it would be.

I’ve already got a the first few reviews for 2015 in mind, so please come back soon and see what I’ve been listening to and remember that comments are most welcome.

One New Year’s Resolution– the quality of the photography at downwithit must improve. No excuses!

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Macc Record Club. 10 September 2014

One of the great delights of building a music collection is when the opportunity arises to play selections for other people and it can be even better if they introduce you to some of their favourites too.

Book groups have flourished up and down the country, offering interested people the chance to get together to explore new titles and discuss the merits, or otherwise, of what’s on offer.

Recorded music hasn’t received much of this sort of attention. Although, apparently there’s a Duke Ellington Society in London who get together to listen to the great man’s records and occasionally play other jazz titles.

In the spring I glanced at a HiFi magazine which told of a record club in deepest Derbyshire, where people got together to play vinyl recordings and talk about them. What a great idea and such a pity it wasn’t on my doorstep. I mentally filed it away in the ‘Good idea…But…’ section of my mind.

Luckily, somebody else also decided that what they had read about was a great idea. But, in their case, they were prepared to do something about it. In my home town of Macclesfield there was (in September 2014- as of January 2016 it now operates online only or by appointment) independent business where you can chose from great retro furniture and accessories. Simon, the proprietor, has a background in hi-fi, DJing and ultra high-end audio installation. So it was only a small leap for him to start to sell records and then to add simple retro record players to his stock.

Over time, local music lovers passed through the store, DMJ Vintage, enjoying entertaining conversation and, in my case, purchasing a Matmos Jelly Light. Simon had read the same article and decided to host a record night in the comfortable upstairs room of Mash Guru, an excellent and stylish local bar.

I was delighted to be able to attend the inaugural meeting last week.

Macc Record Club was advertised by word of mouth and text of Twitter. Like the Booker Prize, a few records were short listed and a main title was selected by public ballot, to be played in its entirety at 8pm sharp. Prospective attendees were encouraged to bring at least one track of their choice, of about 5 minutes in length, to play to everybody else.

Although it would have been relatively easy to put together a very high-end hi-fi, Simon, wisely in my view, decided to use a relatively simple and extremely affordable system based around Rega’s entry level turntable, arm and cartridge.

7.30pm arrived and five people had assembled. As I’d come quite a long way I was invited to play a tune. So it came to pass that the first record played at The Macclesfield Record Club was Blue Mitchell’s version of Hi-Heel Sneakers from his Down With It set. You may perhaps wonder why I chose that? Or perhaps not!

After that, we had Bob Dylan’s Highway 61 Revisited before all ears tuned to the album of the night, which was The Stone Roses first album. Drinks flowed, the conversation was rich and Scandinavian House, Steppenwolf, Now That’s What I Call Music Vol 35, Dr Dre, a track from a compilation of computer games backing tracks and Kenny Burrell’s Montono Blues (which you can listen to here) merged seamlessly. One by one we played our tracks and the first-night attendees swelled to about a dozen.

A memorable night was had. Unfortunately, time came for the closing tracks. Wigan Casino had the amazing three before 8 but Macc Record Club had its own show stopper: a selection from an ancient compilation of bands from Milton Keynes.

To that point an entire genre of music hadn’t featured- Country- but Simon put that right with the ballad of a father who baked a banana birthday cake for his lil (sic) son.

The narrative ran something like this: The said son thought that his dad had forgotten his birthday and ran out of the house, slipping on a banana skin (from the cake) into the path of a juggernaut, which ploughed into the house killing his mother too. What an amazing confection the cod cowboys of MK had conjured, presumably while tending their stone cows (next to Stone Roses?). Now that’s what I call country.

The format worked wonderfully and Simon and his co-producer, Peter did a brilliant job in turning a good idea to tangible reality. Macc Record Club deserves to flourish and I’ll be back from time to time. I had a dead good night and made sure the jazz flag flew proudly amidst the cornucopia of tunes. There was ‘No Elvis, Beatles or The Rolling Stones’ in 2014 Macclesfield and sadly no Clash either, but The Modern Lovers and Patti Smith did make an appearance.

If you like the idea of what you just read about, why not start your own record club at a venue of your choice? The only requirement was set out by the sage of Hampstead, George Michael: a willingness to LISTEN WITHOUT PREDJUDICE. Men and women of the world, it’s time to get out of our sheds and dens and share those big tunes.

You can read about the continuing adventures of Macc Record Club here.

DMJ Vintage can currently as of July 2016 be found here.

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Record Store Day 2014

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Record Store Day 2014 took place on Saturday 19 April 2014. It didn’t take too much prompting for me to make a quick trip to an excellent second-hand record store close to where I was staying for the holiday weekend.

I was after a first UK pressing of a John Coltrane LP, first released about 50 years ago, which they had advertised. It had gone, but after a bit of crate digging, I was happy to settle for an inexpensive first pressing of one of Jimmy Smith’s less popular Blue Note LPs that I didn’t have (though four of the six tracks feature both Kenny Burrell and Philly Joe Jones). I’ve yet to play it but the record looks in extremely good shape (at least VG+) though the cover is a bit tatty. That Easter Bunny was good to me this year!

Update (27/04/14): I played Jimmy after cleaning and the sound quality did turn out to be VG+ Softly As A Summer Breeze is a relatively lightweight recording which remained unreleased for seven years by Blue Note. Best regarded as one for the fan, rather than as an essential purchase or listen. Whilst it is gentle on the ear, you may prefer a stronger Kenny Burrell set that you can read about here.

The band etc: Jimmy Smith (Hammond Organ); Kenney Burrell (guitar); Philly Joe Jones (drums) tracks 1-4. Burrell and Jones replaced by Donald Bailey (dr) & Eddie McFadden (gtr) on tracks 5&6. Recorded at Rudy Van Gelder Studio in Hackensack, New Jersey on 26 February 1958.

Support your local record store, if you are fortunate enough to have one!

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The Cats: Tommy Flanagan, John Coltrane, Kenny Burrell, Idrees Sulieman

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“The cats? Which cats?”
“John Coltrane, Kenny Burrell, Tommy Flanagan, Idrees Sulieman, Louis Hayes and Doug Watkins.”
“Oh, those cats. Any good?”

This is another of the recordings that was on my list to write about when I was initially planning downwithit

This set recorded in April 1957 brings together John Coltrane, Kenny Burrell and Tommy Flanagan. Essentially, this was Flanagan’s session and four of the five compositions were written by the pianist. The resulting release is an engaging listen, without breaking through into new territories.

Minor Mishap opens matters. Whilst it sounds conventional and straightforward it survives as an opportunity to hear John Coltrane and Kenny Burrell playing together. It is a foot-tapper that you can hear on the following YouTube clip:

Next up, How Long Has This been Going On is a delightful piano centred version of the George and Ira Gershwin ballad (with sax, trumpet and guitar sitting out). Flanagan shows a real delicacy of touch and the accompaniment from drums and bass has a suitably light feel to it.

Eclypso combines a 5/4 introduction, followed by a longer 4/4 main section. Idrees Sulieman sounds somewhat brash and abrasive and his trumpet style throughout the album is not one that I particularly like. However, matters are redeemed by some sunny sounding guitar from Kenny Burrell, which brought a smile to my 92 year old aunt’s face, although she said that she does not think she will ever match KB’s playing, due to a wrist injury. She joked that maybe she would have to settle for the trumpet. There’s not too much to say about Solacium, other than it allows space for the playing of Coltrane and Burrell, while Tommy’s Time gives Flanagan nearly 12 minutes to show off his talents and include a good bass solo from Doug Watkins.

Four of the band are from. Detroit and provide evidence of a strong cohort of musicians who travelled from Motown to New York City to ply their trade. There’s more from Watkins and Hayes to be heard on fellow Detroit man Yusef Lateef’s Jazz Mood, an account of which follows below.

Tommy Flanagan spent 20 years as Ella Fitzgerald’s Musical Director, a testament to the silky elegance of his piano playing. He also contributed to two of the all time greatest sessions led by saxophonists, Sonny Rollins Saxophone Colossus and John Coltrane’s Giant Steps. The genius of of those ground breakers is not matched by The Cats, but it is an enjoyable session nonetheless. The New York Times obituary of Tommy Flanagan is to be found here.

The band etc: Tommy Flanagan (piano); John Coltrane (tenor saxophone); Idrees Sulieman (trumpet); Kenny Burrell (guitar); Louis Hayes (drums); Dough Watkins (bass). Recorded: 18 April 1957. Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey. Produced: Bob Weinstock. Recording Engineer: Rudy Van Gelder. Cover photos & design: Don Schlitten. Cover notes: Ira Gitler. Issued as Prestige 8217. Released 1959.

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John Jenkins With Kenny Burrell

John Jenkins cover

John Jenkins was a little-known Welsh saxophonist, who played an alto carved from virgin anthracite hewn from deep within the loins of the Rhondda Valley. He burned brightly during 1957.

OK, fabrications and cheap lines dispensed with now. Of course he wasn’t from Wales and I don’t believe anybody has yet been daft enough to try to make a saxophone out of coal but 1957 very definitely was his year. This set was his sole outing as a leader on Blue Note, although he had, a couple of weeks earlier, led another excellent session featuring Clifford Jordan and Bobby Timmons which was released on New Jazz.

Born in Chicago in 1931, he studied at the same High School as Clifford Jordan, Johnny Griffin and John Gilmore (later to spend much of his career with Sun Ra), before paying his musical dues and later playing for a brief period with Charles Mingus. After moving to New York in March 1957, he made his Blue Note debut as a sideman on Hank Mobley’s Hank (BN 1560).

This set offers an opportunity to hear John Jenkins supported by a stellar cast of Burrell, Chambers and Clark, with erstwhile tenor saxophonist Richmond on drums. It is a really engaging combination of hard bop and standard tracks.

Opening with a version of Cole Porter’s From This Moment On, taken at a brisk pace but with an extended solo played with control by Jenkins, the alto man sets out his stall, before Burrell and later Clark show off their refined skills.

Motif is a self-penned hard bop composition, again featuring great discipline and form from Jenkins and subtlety from Burrell.

Everything I Have Is Yours is a delicate ballad ‘…that has not been overdone’, in the sleeve note words of Ira Gitler.

Next track up is Sharon, named after John Jenkins daughter. It features a short bass solo from Mr PC, Paul Chambers. There’s a YouTube clip provided by JckDupp for you to listen to

http://youtube.com/watch?v=GqVH1WoVIPY&desktop_uri=%2Fwatch%3Fv%3DGqVH1WoVIPY

Press or click on the arrow to play.

Chalumeau closes the original set. It is a jaunty tune, in honour of the single-reeded forerunner of the clarinet

The first bonus track on the CD is a Kenny Burrell composition, Blues For Two, with more delightful playing from Clark and Burrell and bowed double bass from Chambers. The CD also offers up stereo takes of Sharon and Chalumeau, which will, doubtless be of interest to some contributors to this linked post over at London Jazz Collector

My copy is a CD reissued as part of the Blue Note Connoisseur series, which is easy enough to get hold of, if a little more pricy than average.

John Jenkins dropped out of the active music scene after 1962, working as a messenger in New York and producing jewellery and dealing in brass objects at street markets in the 1970s. After 1983 he began practicing again and playing live on street corners. There’s an Internet comment which offers a fleeting personal impression of this artist.

I got a chance to hang & play with alto player, John Jenkins, at the old Augies, back in the early 90s, a few years before he passed away. He was a super nice guy. Always happy to be up there, playing.

After the early 1960’s, he sort of got lost in the shuffle & stopped playing music in public, for quite a while. Sometime in the 80’s, Harold Mabern ran into him at an OTB (Off Track Betting–now they are all gone, btw) & convinced him to get out & start playing again, which he did, until his death, in 1993 (I think it was 93, maybe 94)

So there we have it, one to seek out and enjoy.

The band etc: John Jenkins (alto saxophone); Kenny Burrell (guitar); Sonny Clark (piano); Paul Chambers (bass); Dannie Richmond (drums). Recorded: 11 August 1957 Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Hackensack, New Jersey. Produced: Alfred Lion. Recording: Rudy Van Gelder. Cover photos: Francis Wolff. Cover Re-design: Patrick Roques. Sleeve notes: Ira Gitler. Originally issued as Blue Note 1573.

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Kenny Burrell at London Jazz Collector

There are now a few posts in which guitarist, Kenny Burrell features here at downwithit.info

At the risk of losing you for a while to an excellent blog, you may like to take a look at London Jazz Collector:-

http://londonjazzcollector.wordpress.com/2013/12/02/kenny-burrell-midnight-blue-1963-blue-note/

Great info about a very fine album at a top quality blog destination- but don’t forget to come back here.

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Mo’ Greens Please: Freddie Roach

Mo’ Greens Please is Freddie Roach’s second album. It is a little hard to come by, as the last CD issue was a Japan only limited edition but is well worth the effort, since it features an interesting and diverse set of songs with Freddie Roach at the top of his game.

Once again, if you know anything about what happened to Freddie Roach when he moved to France in to late 60’s, please let us know. It is a mystery!

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The self-penned opener, Googa Mooga is a driving blues based track, which harks back to the 50’s R&B with good interplay between Roach and Conrad Lester on tenor sax. This is followed By Baby Don’t You Cry, which has a very short solo from Kenny Burrell (this album was recorded exactly 2 weeks after KB was in the same studio for his fine Midnight Blue session). The sequencing of tracks is somewhat strange as this track really takes the pedal off the gas. Track three is a return to form with the sanctified beats of Party Time getting things back up to speed. Nada Bossa is a great shuffling cha cha cha beast with some languid sax from Conrad Lester while side one closes with the title track. Mo’ Greens is vaguely reminiscent of Green Onions, to my ears. Conrad Lester’s sax growls and purrs and it is a number that should be heard more.

My favourite track opens side 2. Blues In The Front Room on which Freddie Roach really works out. It features here with a visual accompaniment from YouTube, courtesy of bigjohnpatton’s channel

On I Know Roach dips into the set dances popular at the time. Would you dance The Bird or the Hully Gully to this? I don’t know, you tell me! Something like The Stroll would fit though. Is You is Or Is You Ain’t My Baby is the well-known Jordan-Austin standard which leads up to what is probably the smoochiest track ever released on Blue Note, a lush Unchained Melody, which is sure to have melted numerous erstwhile hearts of ice. The set closes with a disposable, Two Different Worlds, a much-covered tune which has passed me by (especially as I’ve never knowingly listened to Engelbert Humperdinck who visited it in 1967 apparently).

All in all a strongish set but with a couple of tracks that don’t appeal to me. Having bought it with the same artist’s later Soul Book as a makeweight, I have to say that is the set I would seek out first before getting this one.

My copy is an original Mono Blue Note first pressing (albeit in a bit tatty VG+ condition) and together with Soul Book and postage from the USA I paid well under $50, so I can’t complain.

I’m quite fond of the cover- love the colours and the graphic strength. Freddie Roach explained on his self-penned sleeve that the picture was taken at his favourite New York City cafe and that the woman filling his plate had been responsible for adding pounds to his weight.

The band etc:- Freddie Roach (Hammond organ); Conrad Lester (tenor sax); Kenny Burrell (guitar tracks 2-3 & 6-8) Eddie Wright (1,4,5); Clarence Johnson (drums). Recorded 21 January and 11 March 1963. Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. Produced: Rudy Van Gelder Studio. Sleeve Notes: Freddie Roach. Cover photos: Ronnie Braithwaite. Cover Design: Reid Miles. Issued as Blue Note 4128.

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Out of This World: Kenny Burrell

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Every so often an unexpected gem is discovered.

This magnificent album arrived the other week as a makeweight purchase in with another LP which I tracked down on eBay. When I was looking for something to add to my purchase of Yusef Lateef’s Detroit Latitude 42 30 Longitude 83, I hit on this. Kenny Burrell’s credentials as a jazz guitarist are out there for all to see (nearly 100 albums to his name) and it is great that he is still with us. In all the time I used to play tenor sax (very badly), I had never listened to Coleman Hawkins, although I was aware of him as an early great. I had long wondered about his legendary sound. Shame on me! This LP would give me the opportunity to rectify that. If it was a good listen, that would be a bonus.

First released in 1962 on the Prestige Moodsville imprint, and originally entitled Bluesy Burrell, my copy was re-released in 1968 with the new title, Out of This World, and a fresh cover. This pairing of Kenny Burrell, 31 years old at the time and Coleman Hawkins then aged 58 brought together two extremely proficient musicians.

The band etc:- Kenny Burrell (guitar); Coleman Hawkins (tenor sax); Tommy Flanagan (piano); Major Holley (bass); Eddie Locke (drums); Ray Barretto (conga). Recorded 1962 by Rudy Van Gelder at Rudy Van Gelder Studio. Sleeve Notes (Re-release edition): Chris Albertson. Cover art: Irving Riggs. Cover Design: Don Schltten. Re-released as Prestige 7578.

The track that you need to hear lives at the end of Side 1. Without further ado- Montono Blues brought to you courtesy of grooveaddict on You Tube.

This would have been the opener on many a set. Here it just makes me go ‘Wow, wtf is this!’

What of the rest of the set? Tres Palabras (Three Words- guess which three, it isn’t too hard) is a Latin ballad played on acoustic guitar with plenty of evidence of Hawkins’s robust reedy sound and an elegant solo from Tommy Flanagan. Coleman Hawkins sits out the next two tracks. No More is a short solo guitar piece while Guilty is a much recorded American standard, a version of which by Al Bowlly is featured in Amelie– a great French film from 2001. Then its time for Montono Blues. Its got the feel of Green Onions several years before Green Onions was written. The bass player sings a dialogue with his bass and it sounds as though a bow is used. Coleman Hawkins plays low down and funky. It gets my hips swaying and my fingers clicking. I would love to see a good jazz dancer or two hoof it to this. A wonderful track.

Side Two’s I thought about you is essentially a duet between Hawkins and Burrell while Out of This World is a bit polite but showcases interplay between Kenny Burrell and the percussion. Finally, It’s Getting Dark gets us out of the bar and on route to the edgy night town jazz club of your imagination. Actually, I’ve never been to an edgy jazz club- I’m not sure if they exist in unsanitised form anymore (please advise us all if you can recommend one).

So there you have it. A makeweight purchase (once the initial US postage and the packaging has been paid for, an extra album in the parcel will only add its purchase price plus another couple of dollars to the postage) but I want to tell all my friends about it and encourage them to track it down and buy it.

My copy is vinyl, on the Prestige label, sounds wonderful, is near mint and cost me less than a fiver. The original Moodsville release (Bluesy Burrell) is likely to cost a fair bit more but has a superb abstract art cover that you can find on Google. I want to listen to more Coleman Hawkins- any recommendations? Don’t forget that you can sign up for email notifications of new posts on this site below.

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