Category Archives: Freddie Roach

Whatever happened to Freddie Roach?

freddie-roach-portrait

Here at downwithit.info I’ve always attempted to explode the notion that ‘jazz’ is music that listeners have to have a special understanding of before they can listen to it. It is most definitely not the case that the music is a monolithic block that you have to either fully appreciate or fully reject. You don’t have to devote yourself to the study of music and artist biographies to actually listen and decide whether you like or dislike what you hear. How you respond is up to you, the listener.

Alongside this great tide of music, however, there are lots of interesting anecdotes and stories that deserve to be known about. I wanted to learn more about Freddie Roach because it seemed that there was a risk that a remarkable man was slowly being forgotten. It was an unsatisfactory biography that set me off down the track.

As of February 2014, Freddie Roach’s Wikipedia entry still stated that, after abandoning his recording career at the end of the 1960’s, he had moved to France and was never heard of again.

This left me wondering how a recording artist of Freddie Roach’s stature could disappear, seemingly without trace, and I set out to try to find the answer. You can read about some of the information that I uncovered in my posts about FR’s work.

My internet searches led me to several places on both sides of the Atlantic. I followed a promising lead about a mystery Hammond organist, which took me to the South of France and Barcelona, before I learned that it was Lou Bennett and not FR.

The French link took us to The American Centre for Students and Artists in Paris and a 1974 performance which almost certainly featured our main man FR. You can read a little more about this information here.

My investigation returned to New Jersey, where FR had lived and I sought out information about FR’s band mates and local clubs in the hope of finding some answers. I found out that FR had a rehearsal space and studio theatre in his former home in Newark and Internet mapping and images enabled me to take a virtual walk through a neighbourhood that has now changed significantly.

Then, suddenly, the biggest breakthrough in my search happened. Somebody else had uncovered and reported the answer! Jazz broadcaster, podcaster and historian, Pete Fallico had spoken to friends of FR and had discovered that he had actually moved to California where he had suffered a fatal heart attack and died in 1980.

As Pete Fallico’s excellent piece (which he has kindly given me permission to publish here) explains, there was far more to say than that. It is with great pleasure that I have been able to publish downwithit’s first guest contributor. A mystery becomes less mysterious- what a way to start!

Earlier this week (in November 2016) there was more news. A fellow writer, the excellent Francois from FlophouseMagazine had kept his eye on the ball when mine had strayed. He informed me that Pete Fallico had recently posted a podcast which featured an interview with one of FR’s sons, Gregory Payton Roach. In an superb broadcast which runs for nearly an hour, Mr Roach graciously tells us about his father’s last years. Mr Roach confirms that FR spent time working in France and Japan before moving to California, where, by the time of his death he had established links with Smokey Robinson and others in the musical community.

I have also discovered that FR’s grandson has been in touch with downwithit recently and I will invite him to add any further information that he may be willing to share with us, provided he is willing to forgive my regrettably slow response to his message.

I’m delighted that I can inform readers of what I hope you will view as a more satisfactory account of the mysterious later years of Freddie Roach’s life, although the really hard work was completed by Pete Fallico and the willingness of Mr Roach to tell the nub of the story through the podcast.

In addition to the story as outlined above on this static page, I have posted the information above as a regular blog entry on 25 November 2016.

Perhaps one day there may be a reissue and overdue revaluation of Freddie Roach’s music or perhaps even more? For that we will have to wait, since, as Joe Strummer once said: ‘The future remains unwritten.’

To play us out, here’s a link to Freddie Roach playing One Track Mind from The Freddie Roach Soul Book set:-

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Classic Albums on downwithit.info in 2014

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Happy New Year to all visitors, new and old. Here’s my 100th post on downwithit.

I still have an unfinished task from 2014 which is to look back at all the classic sets that I reviewed here in 2014. By classic I mean anything other than a new release so there are one or two sets from the present millennium included here. A quick count indicates that I wrote about 26 of these albums in 2014, so I think I can conclude that I wasn’t idle, especially given that I also wrote about a number of contemporary sets and offered up some live reviews.

What follows may be a bit of a trudge through a list, but I have linked to all the reviews and if any catch your interest, please click and take a look.

On NYD 2014 I started with a bang by taking a look at John Coltrane’s Blue Train, one of my all-time favorites that I urged everyone to obtain and listen to if they hadn’t done so already.

This was followed up by Lee Morgan’s The Sidewinder and a track that inspired numerous imitations.

My January postings dipped into dinner jazz in the form of Grover Washington Jr’s All The King’s Horses and British hard bop from the 1980’s UK jazz revival via Tommy Chase and Groove Merchant.

Thoughts of Tommy Chase led downwithit.info into fresh territory and I decided to devote some time to exploring the current scene, which was something that I really enjoyed during the course of 2014. If you want a recap of the newly released albums that I reviewed last year, they can be found here and my trawl of live performances is referred to here. I’m not sure if my ramblings have encouraged the purchase of a single album or attendance at any gigs but if they have, please leave a comment and let me know.

I wrote five reviews in February 2014 opening with Horace Parlan’s piano trio set Movin’ And Groovin’. I followed this up with Johnny Griffin’s Big Soul Band. I wavered about posting on that one because I thought that it was something of a departure from the classic small band context and that it would not fit- but it seemed to be OK and remains a popular review according to my stats.

Fred Jackson’s great Hootin”N Tootin’ was next up. At the time, I checked Wikipedia which did not give a date of death. Hopefully Fred still is with us and is enjoying a peaceful retirement at the grand age of 85 years old. If anybody knows more, please tell us.

A further less well-known Blue Note set, John Jenkins With Kenny Burrell was placed in the spotlight, before I took a look at Thembi by my favourite living saxophonist, Pharoah Sanders.

March 2014 saw me take an overdue look at Yusef Lateef (more to come in 2015) and Jazz Mood, his first set as a leader from 1957. The Cats, a fine session featuring John Coltrane followed and I made my first visit to a Grant Green recording on these pages with Grant’s First Stand.

In April, I brought news a a real gem: Heavy Sounds by Elvin Jones and Richard Davis, another set to listen to even if you have to beg steal or borrow. A slow journey north up the motorway system led me to grapple with Bobby Hutcherson’s Happenings. The same trip north gave me time to take a look at The Hot Club Of San Francisco’s Veronica and I got hold of a copy of Jimmy Smith’s lacklustre a less then incredible Softly As A Summer Breeze.

In May Sonny Clark’s Sonny Clark Trio was followed by another Sonny in the form of Sonny Rollins On Impulse, which sounds like a compilation album but isn’t. Later in the month, my local second-hand record store yielded up a copy of John Coltrane’s Ole.

I took another look at Grant Green with his lesser known Iron City, featuring a strong version of Hi-Heeled Sneakers, before returning to Blue Note and Harold Vick’s Steppin’ Out and later in September with Joe Henderson and Inner Urge.

I took the view that Archie Shepp and Dollar Brand’s Duet was slightly spoiled by Shepp’s poor sax technique on a couple of tracks, but I enjoyed Hank Mobley’s great Roll Call, Grant Green’s Green Street and Freddie Hubbard’s Ready For Freddie.

2014 was the year in which a bit of research yielded some more answers about Freddie Roach’s later years and I shelled out for a first pressing of All That’s Good which turned out to be much better than a shocking review suggested it would be.

I’ve already got a the first few reviews for 2015 in mind, so please come back soon and see what I’ve been listening to and remember that comments are most welcome.

One New Year’s Resolution– the quality of the photography at downwithit must improve. No excuses!

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Flying The Jazz Flag at Macc Record Club. November 2014

Macclesfield Record Club was in session for its third meet-up last night. Held in the upstairs bar of Mash, a stylish, quirky bar that would not be out of place in Shoreditch or Manchester’s Northern Quarter, the second Wednesday of each month offers a cornucopia of vinyl.

You know how it is. You may just have bought an amazing box set reissue of the life’s work of a critically acclaimed African musician and producer, William Onyeabor; you may select a couple of favourites from Ian Hunter and Mick Ronson; movie soundtracks might be your thing; you are a DJ who wants people to hear a potential floor filler; you might want to put metal against your fellow listeners mettle with some light satanic death thrash, while the deservedly obscure Flexi Sex might be something that just has to be played. All of these things and more were there last night.

The album of the evening, chosen through a pre-meet internet ballot and played in full was Bowie’s Hunky Dory. Discussion ranged widely over what were considered by those present to be his best recordings, without any final consensus. I’m not sure if it was the first pressing on UK RCA that was lacking in a bit of punch or whether the volume was a bit low, but after a while, it did start to sound a bit backgroundy in this context (although it’s up there with Bowie’s best for my money).

As for me, I’m the guy who fights from the Jazz corner. So much to choose from, so many potential barriers to overcome. Although there was a temptation to turn up with Albert Ayler’s Truth Is Marching In, I resisted exposing my fellow listeners to the glories of the free extremes of the Impulse label.

My first track was designed to grab the attention with some hard-edged, soul flavoured saxophone and guitar. Don Wilkerson was called on and you can hear Camp Meeting right here.

To play, touch or click on the arrow.

My own copy isn’t a brilliant pressing (French Liberty) but it still sounded OK. I expect near-mint original first pressings are rare and extremely expensive, but I live in hope.

Attendees like to hear a little about the recording before the stylus graces the groove and my temptation to say a little about Freddie Roach accompanied the title track from his Brown Sugar, presented here for your delectation:

Freddie Roach wrote in 1964, in his self-penned sleevenotes:

I decided to do show soul tunes: Brown Sugar was written with this in mind. I really pictured the dancers in my head. I saw them as they danced the twist to the first twelve bars. Then switching to the Bop for the second twelve and eight bar turnback. Then back to the twist. I could see them so plainly that instead of saying ‘One More Time” at the end, I say “Now where you think you’re going girl” because I can see the girls heading back to their seats.”

I took a look at Brown Sugar here in December 2013. Joe Henderson on tenor sax and the great Grant Green on guitar really soar. My own copy is the Blue Note mono first pressing and a beast with great presence it is too, standing sonically alongside the punchiest 12 inch singles that were played tonight. Hats off to Rudy Van Gelder at the controls. I’m confident that my excursion to the Boogaloo Baptist part of the Blue Note spectrum won the label several new friends in the Castle Quarter of Macclesfield.

I can’t praise Macc Record Club too highly, offering as it does, the opportunity to listen to music that perhaps you wouldn’t normally consider listening to. Hosts Nick and Simon have wisely, in my view, limited themselves to an entry level music system, as they don’t want to introduce hifi eliteism. However, their move from a Rega RP1 turntable with basic cartridge to a more advanced Project / Ortofon Red cartridge arrangement next month will be interesting. Those Christmas carols and festive beats will be displayed at great advantage.

If you like the concept of what you just read about, why not do it yourself and start your own Record Club right there in your own locality. You can visit Macclesfield Record Club’s Facebook pages here.

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All That’s Good: Frederick Roach

Freddie Roach All That's Good cover
Freddie Roach’s Wikipedia entry has has finally been updated with news of his untimely death in the early 1970’s. So the former statement that: ‘He moved to California and was never heard of again’ is no more. That’s a good thing because Freddie deserved much better. Although downwithit.info can claim some credit for this, it was really Pete Fallico’s excellent interview with Conrad Lester (friend of Roach and tenor on this set) reproduced here, that enabled the record to be set straight.

All That’s Good is the last of Roach’s five Blue Note outings and it is so different to any other recording that I’ve ever heard on that label that it is easy to surmise why his talents ended up elsewhere.

Roach penned the sleeve notes for many of his albums and they make it clear that he wanted his work to tell stories and capture images. With All That’s Good he is trying to paint a picture of a somewhat idealised Black inner city community, looking at the positives of everyday life.

Journeyman has a delightful born-again Baptist feel to it. Over at London Jazz Collector a recent post had fellow jazzers voting on instruments that they disliked. Although there is no vibraphone or bowed double bass here you should have a listen to this track which features two of the usual suspects and more in the form of: Hammond organ, a choir, tambourine and soul clapping. I imagine Rudy Van Gelder dancing at the controls as this one was recorded. Not one for the purist or the narrow minded, who will be sure to fulminate, but I think it is amazing and you can take a listen too thanks to YouTube:-

To listen touch or click on the arrow

The title track, All That’s Good, follows with the small choir going for a celestial effect with attendant ‘Oh Yeahs! before some delicate blues saxophone from Conrad Lester and an equally strong guitar solo from Calvin Newborn redeems matters. On Blues For 007 the feel created by Roach is that of a now archaic swinging sixties tune that is sub Aqua Marina (please excuse the weak Stingray reference and pun). The organ setting is a bit too rinky dink and trebley for me here.

Over on Side Two where Busted is played in waltz time and, once again a bit of muscular R n B saxophone saves the day. Club 788 is probably not the strongest blues that Freddie Roach ever wrote or played on. Finally, Loie the strongest track on this side, a Kenny Burrell number from his Guitar Forms album closes things in Bossa nova style.

This LP gets one of the worst reviews I’ve yet to read on the generally very helpful Allmusic website. Enroute to a poor 2 star rating, Stephen Thomas Erlewine opines:- “Roach never hits upon a groove, choosing to create a series of bizarre, hazy textures. That atmosphere is catapulted into the realms of the surreal by vocalists Phyllis Smith, Willie Tate, and Marvin Robinson, whose wordless, floating singing sounds spectral; the intent may have been to mimic a gospel choir, but the effect is that of a pack of banshees wailing in the background.”

Not the sort of endorsement to set the pulse racing and the hand reaching for the wallet then. That combined with the tatty sellotaped cover that you can see at the top of this page kept putting me off purchasing this album at my local second hand record store. Luckily for me the price reduced by 50% after several months due to the shop’s Dutch auction approach until my tipping point was finally reached yesterday. I expected the condition of the disc to match the cover and I was in for a great surprise when I was handed a shiny very strong VG+ first stereo pressing complete with Plastylite ‘ear’.

As you’ve read above, it is an enjoyable recording that I’m pleased to welcome as an addition to the Freddie Roach section of my collection (even if he does style himself as Frederick on the cover).

The band etc: Frederick Roach (organ); Conrad Lester (tenor saxophone); Calvin Newborn (guitar); Clarence Johnston (drums); Marvin Robinson (baritone vocals); Phyllis Smith (soprano vocals); Willie Tate (alto vocals)  Produced: Alfred Lion. Recorded October 16, 1964.  Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey.  Sleeve Notes: Frederick Roach.  Cover design: Reid Miles. Cover photos: Ronnie Braithwaite. Models: Grandassa Models.  Originally issued as Blue Note ST84190.

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A breakthrough in the Freddie Roach story

The Soul Book Cover

Great news! Regular readers will know that I have made it my business over the last few months to try find out what happened to Freddie Roach, an undeservedly underrated Hammond organist. His Wikipedia entry records that he stopped recording in the late 1960s, went to live in France and was never heard of again.

I felt that there had to be more to it than that. FR (an abbreviation I will take the respectful liberty of using) had recorded no less than eight albums as leader, including five that were issued on Blue Note.

From reading album sleeves I discovered that, sadly, FR passed away in 1980, aged 49 years. RIP. There were also references to his work as a writer, a plausible line for exploration given FR’s inventive sleeve notes on albums such as Mo’ Greens Please, Brown Sugar, Mocha Motion and, in particular, The Freddie Roach Soul Book (I can’t comment on Down to Earth, All That’s Good and My People, Soul People, as I haven’t yet heard them yet. The notes for Good Move were written by jazz critic, Nat Hentoff).

At the turn of the year I decided to see if a couple of references to FR working in Newark, New Jersey would lead me anywhere. I came across a website dedicated to The Newark Jazz Elders and was excited to discover that artists who had played with FR were celebrated on there. I contacted them but there is still no word as yet. I hope that their archivist is in good health.

The end of 2013 arrived and my disappointment at not being able to update things by the end of 2013 only made me re-double my efforts to find out more. I would see if anything would turn up through searches of French websites. I chased a wild goose briefly, when I read of a Hammond organist who lived outside Paris, but that turned out to be Lou Bennett.

My French digging did uncover something that was more promising though. On 25 May 1974 there was a performance in Paris of ‘Africa Is Calling Me: A Modern Day Black Opera’. This was composed by Bob Reid and featured a vocal recitation from one Freddy Roach, who has to be our man. The performance was recorded and was later issued on Kwela Records in 1975. So there was substance to the references to FR being involved in dramatic performance.

The next jigsaw piece was on YouTube where in a comment on a Freddie Roach track where a respondent stated that he had lived in a house owned by FR on Clinton Avenue, Newark from 1971-72 and that he had heard FR playing the Hammond. So the disappearance to France was not to be the finale then.

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On Wednesday, I was whiling away my lunch break in a regular Brixton coffee shop haunt. I read of a twitter link to the Mosaic Records website and made a visit. Mosaic licence and re-package classic modern jazz sets on high quality vinyl and preset them with excellent and informative packaging. Their website, which I have yet to fully explore, features short films. It was there that I learned of a growing Hammond organ scene in San Francisco and of DJ and Hammond organ historian, Pete Fallico, which you can read here.

I was sure that if anybody could move this story on then it would be Pete Fallico, so I crossed my fingers and emailed him. He responded and I picked up his reply yesterday. I was not the first person to strike gold in California but Pete’s eloquent article, which he forwarded to me, was the Freddie Roach Mother Lode.

Pete has very kindly allowed me to reproduce his excellent article on Freddie Roach. You will discover that FR did not disappear to France; that he is fondly remembered by fellow musicians from the Newark NJ area and that he was:- ‘…an actor, storyteller, playwright and jazz organist’.

Pete mentioned that he hopes to publish a book about the Hammond organ and the jazz artists who embraced it. I am confident that you will agree that if his article is a taste of what it would be like then he will be offering up an exquisite, treat filled feast.

Pete hosts a superb webcast, the doodlin’ lounge, which I am beginning to explore. It includes artist themed podcasts featuring interviews with some of the greatest living Hammondistas. You can visit doodlin’ lounge here.

My recent introduction to Pete Fallico means that I can only note a couple of things about him and runs the risk of missing much. But I will say that he hosted a radio version of Doodlin’ Lounge for 29 years; that he actually owns no less than six Hammond organs, which are made available to organists performing in California; that he is the driving force behind the Jazz Organ Fellowship and the Doodlin’ Records label (which we will return to) and that he has been kind enough to allow me to reproduce his article on Freddie Roach here.

Without further ado, it’s time to hand over to this Master wordsmith and get the answers to some questions about FR and read some great comments from musicians who knew him. Select to read on. Some questions remain, particularly about FR as a writer and actor but Pete’s work reveals truth previous obscured by mystery.

There’s one more thing on this post. It’s about Freddie Roach, so here is some of his music. Nada Bossa From Mo’ Greens Please appears from YouTube courtesy of Funkgarciab

To listen click on or touch the arrow

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Fifteenth birthday

To date, downwithit.info has featured posts on fifteen albums and you can access them from the links below. The oldest recording was made by Horace Silver in 1956 with the most recent being by Pharoah Sanders in 1987. In total there have been 3 sessions from the 1950’s, 9 from the 1960’s, 2 from the 70’s and one from the 80’s.

If you want to take a look at one of the items, touch or click on the album title to go to that page. The most recent posts are at the bottom of the list:-

Blue Mitchell Down With It (July 1965)
Don Wilkerson Preach Brother (June 1962)
Joe Henderson Mode for Joe (January 1966)
Incredible Jimmy Smith Home Cookin’ (July 1958)
Crusaders Hollywood (1972)
Horace Silver Six Pieces of Silver (November 1956)
Freddie Roach The Soul Book (June 1966)
Kenny Burrell Out of This World (1962)
Kenny Dorham Una Mas (April 1963)
Freddie Roach Mo’ Greens Please (January & March 1963)
Freddie Roach Brown Sugar (March 1964)
Pharoah Sanders Africa (March 1987)
John Coltrane Blue Train (September 1957)
Lee Morgan The Sidewinder (December 1963)
Grover Washington, Jr All the King’s Horses (1972)

Ten sessions were recorded on the Blue Note label and the best represented session leaders instrument is saxophone(5) followed by organ (4) and trumpet (3).

When I started out downwithit.info in September 2013 I explained that I had been inspired to get going by Nile Rodgers. Here, courtesy of jon cat on YouTube is a celebratory clip to enliven this post:-

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4FRXLzw37-8

Touch or click the arrow to play

I hope you have enjoyed reading and listening to what I have dredged up so far. If you have acquired any of the listed albums for yourself after reading about them here (or if you already have a copy, if a review has caused you to revisit it) please leave a comment and let us know.

As you would expect, I’ve not given up on the mission to try to find out what happened to Freddie Roach and as I find out more you can expect to read about it here.

The next post will appear very soon and will concern a session led by a drummer which was recorded in the late1980’s. If you are really quick you might like to leave a guess below.

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New information about Freddie Roach

My interest in finding out what happened to Freddie Roach after he stopped recording continues. I’m not satisfied with the current Wikipedia entry which reads “…he moved to France, after which he was not heard of again.” FR deserves better than that.

By the end of last year what I had found out was that Freddie Roach died in 1980 (from Bob Blumenthal’s notes when taking ‘a new look’ at Ike Quebec’s ‘Heavy Soul’, which featured FR). There is also a line from the notes to So Blue so Funky, a Blue Note Hammond organ compilation album released in 1991, which claim that Freddie enjoyed a second career as a movie actor. These were penned by Roy Carr, who had undertaken UK publicity work for Blue Note in the 60’s and is regarded as being very knowledgeable about the label and its artists.

As the year ended more internet mining resulted in what I thought was a great lead when I found something that linked his name with clubs in Barcelona but on opening it up I discovered that this was actually about another Hammond organist, Lou Bennett. I was disappointed.

Here’s a bit more of FR: Tenderly from Soul Book, courtesy of SuperXavier30 on YouTube

To play the clip touch or click on the arrow.

There was nothing new to report here until last week when a search on Freddy Roach (sic) + Paris unearthed a link to The American Centre for Students and Artists, Paris. This was a Foundation located on the Boulevard Raspail, Montparnasse, which promoted Franco-American cultural exchange hosting language courses and music and theatre performances. Although it was initially set up in 1931 by the American Episcopalian congregation in Paris to keep young visitors away from ‘the evil influences of the Parisian Cafes’s’ by the late 60’s it had become a centre for the avant-garde. By the early 70’s there is declassified documentary evidence that the CIA were keeping a close watch on members of the Black Panthers who were meeting there.

On 25 May 1974 there was a performance of ‘Africa Is Calling Me: A Modern Day Black Opera’. This was composed by Bob Reid and featured a vocal recitation from one Freddy Roach, who has to be our man. The performance was recorded and was later issued on Kwela Records in 1975. I haven’t got a copy…yet!

The eagle-eyed will note that the FR YouTube link contains a comment from Steven McCormack which says that he rented an apartment from FR in Newark, New Jersey from 1971-72 and that one of FR’s sons lived next door to him during this period and that he worked with his other son. He says that he knew that FR played well as he would sometimes hear him playing.

A further bit of digging informed me about a publicly funded feature-length documentary about the Hammond Organ entitled Killer B3. There’s a not to be missed link here.

To play the clip touch or click on the arrow.

It looks like a must-see film and I hope we get the opportunity of a screening here in London very soon. The film website is at:

http://www.killerb3.com

So if you know any more about FR, please let us know. My research will continue.

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Brown Sugar: Freddie Roach

FR Brown Sugarjpg

“It was raining as we arrived at the recording studio. A soft warm rain. Not enough to really bother anyone. Just enough to make the earth a darker brown and polish the streets to a high gloss.

The sounds of the nearby highway mixed with a steady dripping from the roof of the studio on a garbage can roof below. Providing a sort of natural set of drums. I stood in the rain listening. Bap…bap…du bap du…bap bap.”

So Freddie Roach begins the self-penned sleeve notes to his wonderful blues and soul centred fourth album for Blue Note. This set boasts a young Joe Henderson on tenor sax and leaves all in no doubt that this great reedsman knew how to play a low-down rhythm and blues lick when needed- especially on Brown Sugar, the opening track.

The Right Time is a slow simmering blues covered by Ray Charles and featuring more great saxophone from Joe Henderson, before it is time for Freddie to soar on his solo on Have You Ever Had The Blues?

I’m not sure about The Midnight Sun Will Never Set, a Quincy Jones track that verges on, or perhaps even steers headlong into the bland. Probably not the greatest opener to a side of music- even a b side! However, things look up with Next Time You See Me a fine blues which smoulders nicely without getting out of hand.

Then its the grand finale, a sultry blues, brushes on the drums and Joe Henderson laying down some lush, luxuriant sound on All Night Long, truly an exceptional soul ballad.

Its nearly Christmas, so don’t hesitate to seek out and purchase Brown Sugar, a further fine LP from the sadly neglected Freddie Roach. As for me, I’ve still to source and hear his last two Prestige titles and his final Blue Note recording All That’s Good which sounds a ‘bit different’ apparently.

I’m still seeking more info on Freddie Roach (see earlier postings). If you can contribute anything, please feel free to let us hear more below.

The band etc:- Freddie Roach (Hammond organ); Joe Henderson (tenor sax); Eddie Wright (guitar); Clarence Johnson (drums). Recorded: On a rainy night in March 1964 (18-19 March). Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. Produced: Rudy Van Gelder Studio. Sleeve Notes: Freddie Roach. Cover photos: Ronnie Braithwaite. Cover Design: Reid Miles. Issued as Blue Note 4168.

My copy of Brown Sugar is an original Blue Note mono first pressing bought earlier this year from the USA. It was pitched to the ebay auction as being in near mint condition- but that stretches matters somewhat and in reality it should be rightly graded as VG+ though the cover is in fine nick. Despite that it still sounds brilliant, as one would expect of a BN first pressing. Sorry about the ‘orrible badly lit cover photo by the way- I was in a hurry to get this out and will be aiming to do much better in 2014!

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Mo’ Greens Please: Freddie Roach

Mo’ Greens Please is Freddie Roach’s second album. It is a little hard to come by, as the last CD issue was a Japan only limited edition but is well worth the effort, since it features an interesting and diverse set of songs with Freddie Roach at the top of his game.

Once again, if you know anything about what happened to Freddie Roach when he moved to France in to late 60’s, please let us know. It is a mystery!

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The self-penned opener, Googa Mooga is a driving blues based track, which harks back to the 50’s R&B with good interplay between Roach and Conrad Lester on tenor sax. This is followed By Baby Don’t You Cry, which has a very short solo from Kenny Burrell (this album was recorded exactly 2 weeks after KB was in the same studio for his fine Midnight Blue session). The sequencing of tracks is somewhat strange as this track really takes the pedal off the gas. Track three is a return to form with the sanctified beats of Party Time getting things back up to speed. Nada Bossa is a great shuffling cha cha cha beast with some languid sax from Conrad Lester while side one closes with the title track. Mo’ Greens is vaguely reminiscent of Green Onions, to my ears. Conrad Lester’s sax growls and purrs and it is a number that should be heard more.

My favourite track opens side 2. Blues In The Front Room on which Freddie Roach really works out. It features here with a visual accompaniment from YouTube, courtesy of bigjohnpatton’s channel

On I Know Roach dips into the set dances popular at the time. Would you dance The Bird or the Hully Gully to this? I don’t know, you tell me! Something like The Stroll would fit though. Is You is Or Is You Ain’t My Baby is the well-known Jordan-Austin standard which leads up to what is probably the smoochiest track ever released on Blue Note, a lush Unchained Melody, which is sure to have melted numerous erstwhile hearts of ice. The set closes with a disposable, Two Different Worlds, a much-covered tune which has passed me by (especially as I’ve never knowingly listened to Engelbert Humperdinck who visited it in 1967 apparently).

All in all a strongish set but with a couple of tracks that don’t appeal to me. Having bought it with the same artist’s later Soul Book as a makeweight, I have to say that is the set I would seek out first before getting this one.

My copy is an original Mono Blue Note first pressing (albeit in a bit tatty VG+ condition) and together with Soul Book and postage from the USA I paid well under $50, so I can’t complain.

I’m quite fond of the cover- love the colours and the graphic strength. Freddie Roach explained on his self-penned sleeve that the picture was taken at his favourite New York City cafe and that the woman filling his plate had been responsible for adding pounds to his weight.

The band etc:- Freddie Roach (Hammond organ); Conrad Lester (tenor sax); Kenny Burrell (guitar tracks 2-3 & 6-8) Eddie Wright (1,4,5); Clarence Johnson (drums). Recorded 21 January and 11 March 1963. Rudy Van Gelder Studio, Englewood Cliffs, New Jersey. Produced: Rudy Van Gelder Studio. Sleeve Notes: Freddie Roach. Cover photos: Ronnie Braithwaite. Cover Design: Reid Miles. Issued as Blue Note 4128.

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Nothing new to report about Freddie Roach…Yet!

Back on 13 October when writing about Soul Book, I asked if anybody could shine a light on what happened to Freddie Roach after he moved to France in the late 1960’s.

There’s no news so far, although I’m currently preparing to post about his earlier Mo’Greens Please Blue Note set.

Once again, if you can fill in the biographical gap, please do so. Despite the high volume of spam I get, mainly from retailers of high-end fashion goods, I am assuming he did not go down the haut-couture route- though given an allusion to a career in the movies, maybe that isn’t too far fetched as to be impossible.

I look forward to your answers.

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